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Availability of Phosphorus Fertilizer

A recent study of phosphorus (P) reaction to dry and wet soils offers insight about the fate and availability of phosphorus fertilizer when applied to dry soils.

Boron – A Critical Nutrient Required for Root Growth and Potassium Uptake

A balanced supply of essential macro- and micronutrients is one of the most important factors to achieve higher crop yields. Boron (B) is one of eight micronutrients needed for proper plant growth. Lack of B in plant tissue can reduce cell wall function and stability, cell elongation, root growth, nutrient uptake and crop yields. This article describes the role of B in root growth and nutrient uptake, with a special emphasis on potassium (K).

Boron – How to Extend Nutrient Availability

Although boron (B) is considered the most deficient micronutrient in the world after zinc, dynamics of B use in plants and soils have continued to perplex farmers, agronomists and researchers for decades.

Corn Rootworm-Resistant Traits and Nutrient Removal

Rapid adoption of rootworm-resistant corn hybrids in the past five years has helped many farmers take corn yields to the next level. While corn varieties with insect resistance traits have eased insect control, it's important to remember that the investment in high-tech seed must be paired with other state-of-the-art agronomic practices, including a strong soil fertility program and balanced crop nutrition.

Don’t Forget Zinc when Applying Phosphorus to Your Farm

Phosphorus (P) fertilizer is often added to cropping systems to increase yield, but growers should not overlook the importance of micronutrients like Zinc (Zn). Understanding some of the nutrient interactions that affect nutrient availability can help with management decisions like fertilizer source.

It's Time to Reevaluate Canola P Fertility!

Are you seed-placing your phosphorus (P) and basing application rates on seed safety rather than crop requirements? You may be leaving yield on the table. Recent research out of the University of Manitoba examining seed-safe rates of P and sulfur (S) in canola is showing that P applied at rates based on seed safety may not be adequate to maximize canola yields.

Looking Beyond the Big Three in Soybeans

The objective of a recently published study conducted by University of Illinois plant physiologist Dr. Fred Below and recent doctoral graduates Dr. Ross Bender and Dr. Jason Haegele was to identify which secondary macronutrients and micronutrients demand attention in a new era of soybean production.

Macronutrients for 'Macro' Soybean Yields

While soybeans were introduced to the United States in the late 1800s as a forage source for cattle, it wasn't until 1935 that the number of acres for soybean grain exceeded forage-based acres. This milestone marked the beginning of a new era in soybean production, which has influenced the fertility needs of soybeans.

Magnesium for Balanced Crop Nutrition

Magnesium (Mg) is one of three secondary macronutrients, along with calcium and sulfur, required for balanced crop nutrition. Often overlooked, Mg deficiencies can lead to reduced crop growth and yield.

Maximize Yields and Sulfur Availability

Corn growers need balanced crop nutrition to maximize a corn crop's yield potential and get the most out of their fertilizer investment. In practice, this requires making all of the required nutrients available to the corn crop at the right time.

Oxidation of Elemental Sulfur in Soils

Oxidation of elemental S in soil is a microbial process requiring the presence of both water and oxygen.

Phosphorus Fertility – Do We Need to Look Deeper?

When measuring phosphorus (P) availability in the soil profile, agronomists tend to focus on the first few inches of topsoil. After all, P fertilizer is applied to the upper soil layer, reduced tillage limits soil mixing, most roots are present at upper depths and P is relatively immobile in the soil. So, the top layer should be where plants take most P from, right? Not entirely.

Soil pH Levels Indicate a Need to Adjust P and Zn Fertility in Soybeans

Raising a productive crop depends greatly on the nutrients a plant is able to access during its life cycle. Many factors influence the availability of those nutrients, including soil pH. For instance, as soil pH increases, the availability of phosphorus (P), zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) decreases. Although variety selection can help manage iron deficiency in soybeans, fertilizer application is still needed to address the P and Zn deficiencies prevalent in high-pH soils.

The Impact of High Yields on Deficient Soils

Record yields equal record removal of nutrients and should indicate a need for record soil nutrient replenishment.